Noem’s #CostOfRepeal: 9,000 young South Dakotans lose coverage

Yet another damaging consequence of Congresswoman Kristi Noem’s push to repeal the Affordable Care Act is that 9,000 South Dakota young adults on their parents’ health insurance plans would now be at risk of losing their coverage. Noem and her Republican Congress’ obsession with repeal would leave more than 3 million young adults at the mercy of insurance companies, who would be free once again to do whatever they want to hike rates or kick young adults off their parents’ plans altogether.

Through the Affordable Care Act, 3 million young adults – including  9,000 in South Dakota – can stay on their parents’ health
plans until their 26th birthday. However,  Noem has repeatedly voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act, leaving young adults – especially transitioning students and recent graduates – vulnerable to losing their coverage and sudden financial hardship.

Giving parents the opportunity to keep their kids on family health insurance plans is one of the most popular parts of the Affordable Care Act. Why would Noem want to take away health insurance from 9000 young South Dakotans?

BACKGROUND:

Congresswoman Noem’s Crusade to Gut the Affordable Care Act, Would Deny  9,000 Kids and Young Adults in South Dakota Under the Age of 26 from Staying on Their Parents Health Care. The Affordable Care Act expanded the eligibility age for dependents to remain on their parent’s health care plans to the age of 26. By repealing the Affordable Care Act  9,000 kids and young adults in South Dakota under the age of 26 would lose the guaranteed option of enrolling in their parents’ health care plan. [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,6/19/12]

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